Nothing New, Everything New- Heimtextil Trends 2021/2022- Nisha Designs

We live in a time where nothing is new, and yet everything is new. We do new things in old ways and we use old technologies in new ways. We see trends that are new yet familiar. With the latest colour, design and material trends for 21/22, we encourage you to rethink, redo and remake to make your business fit for the future. 

Extensive visual material and composed colour palettes, including exact colour values, allow you to apply the trends specifically to your own collection.- Heimtextil

People Are Turning Tables Into Stunning Succulent Gardens- Nish Designs

Succulents are unofficially the cats of the plant world. People either love or hate ‘em, and they make the most camera-loved plants for their crazy colors, shapes, and varieties.

But it turns out, there is one more way you can put these incredible plants to use. Thanks to mad crafty skills and aesthetic goals, people have been upgrading their tables into full-blown succulent gardens.

Both a green oasis and a place to put your mug, these tables are something I didn’t know I needed, but I am adding one to the basket at this very moment.

Succulent-Tables
Succulent-Tables
Succulent-Tables

Dustin explained that blooming tables are perfect for people who lack the space for traditional gardening methods and want more plants in their homes. But since succulents require a good amount of sunlight to keep them from stretching and getting leggy, he suggested placing a lamp over them or adding incandescent light bulbs.

Succulent-Tables
Succulent-Tables
Succulent-Tables

In order for the succulents to prosper while being planted as part of the table, one has to keep in mind that “plants tend to do better when you pull them from a similar environment that you are moving them to.” He gave an example: “succulents that grew up in low light areas will do better indoors than succulents who were sourced from high light areas.”

It turns out that, for a succulent, the table serves as a pot, which it may outgrow with time. “Sometimes a plant will grow too big for the table and need to be removed,” but it’s “completely natural.”#7

Succulent-Tables
Succulent-Tables
Succulent-Tables

Dustin also said that it is in fact possible for you to make your own blooming table, and that’s how his own company was started. “We saw the beauty in housing our plants indoors this way and set out to develop a product that would solve a lot of the problems that come with an at-home build.”

Meanwhile, while many DIY succulent tables would look adorable, not all would function as a table. Dustin explained that “a lot of at-home builds, while beautiful, lack the functionality of an actual table—leaving you with something too unstable to set anything on.” So you’ve got to keep an eye on the stability if you’re planning on building one.#10

Succulent-Tables
Succulent-Tables
Succulent-Tables
Succulent-Tables
Succulent-Tables
Succulent-Tables
Succulent-Tables
Succulent-Tables
Succulent-Tables
Succulent-Tables
Succulent-Tables

Source: https://thewildchild.co.za/people-are-turning-tables-into-stunning-succulent-gardens/

DESIREE SUN DELIGHT FOR ENERGY-SAVING GLARE AND PRIVACY PROTECTION- Nisha Designs

We have equipped our classic Desiree Chintz with a metallized backing, thus transforming it into an energy-saving sheer with a glare and privacy function that provides sun protection similar to a sunscreen. The metallized backing reflects the sun’s rays and thus prevents the room from heating up too much. This additional feature gives the backing a silver metallic shimmer without shining through to the front. The matt fabric side faces the room and creates a cosy, homely character. Desiree Sun not only protects against the sun, but can also serve as a privacy screen which at the same time – due to its slight transparency – still gives the room enough light. Particularly noteworthy is the soft drape, which is not present in classic aluminium-vaporized articles.to the article

TECHNICAL VALUES

Extensive tests resulted in the following photometric values:

  • Light transmission: 25% (percentage of total visible sunlight passing through the curtain)
  • Light reflection: 45 %
  • Light absorption: 30 % (The amount of radiant energy absorbed by the curtain and converted into heat)
  • UV transmission: 25 %.

Comprehensive tests resulted in the following solar technical values:

  • Solar transmission: 26 % (energy penetrating the fabric / the smaller the better)
  • Solar reflection: 46 % (energy reflected from the back of the fabric / the bigger the better)
  • Solar absorption: 28 % (energy absorbed by the material and converted into heat / the smaller the better)

g-value: 0.42 (total energy transmittance: energy input through the blind; the lower the g-value, the less energy passes through the blind and the lower the temperature behind it)

Fc value: 0.72 (reduction factor of a sun protection device, the smaller the better)

Although this product is similar in function to our DELITHERM products, it is a completely different article in production and in handling. As Desiree Sun has no metalized yarn but is metalized only on the backside, the article looks more homely and offers a larger variety of colours. Special attention must therefore be paid to the processing instructions.


Advantages of energy-saving glare and privacy protection:

  • Glare protection
  • improves the thermal room comfort
  • protects against strong heat radiation and UV radiation
  • reduces the intensity of air conditioning systems (reduction of CO2 emissions)
  • provides for more comfortable viewing at the monitor workstation
  • daylight-permeable
  • respects the privacy
  • is permanently flame-retardant
  • little sewing effort

Greenery and nature come face to face with animal force- STK Restaurant in Olomouc- Nisha Designs

STK Restaurant in Olomouc, Czech Republic

Olomouc Steak Restaurant

Steak restaurant housed in a former car repair shop.

Spontaneity, raw materials, pristine nature and above all – meat. The best steaks in the city of Olomouc.

STK Restaurant in Olomouc, Czech Republic

Ten years back, you would have come here to have your vehicle inspection certificate stamped. Entering the place, you would have covered your ears to escape the noise of the roaring car engines and watched the mechanics checking clutches and brakes. As the shift ended and the chaps clocked out to leave for home all hungry, they might have been dreaming about one kind of meal.

STK Restaurant in Olomouc, Czech Republic
STK Restaurant in Olomouc, Czech Republic

The juicy steak they would eat seated at a solid wood table supported by raw steel legs. Greenery and nature come face to face with animal force. That’s the core of Steak Restaurant’s (STK) interior, housed in a former car repair shop which gave the steakhouse its name.

Olomouc Steak Restaurant design by Komplits

STK in Olomouc emphasises simplicity and quality, both in its food and its interior. Instead of trying to deny and erase its greasy automobile heritage, the place embraces it. The 320 square metres of the restaurant authentically engage individual elements of its past.

Olomouc Steak Restaurant interior dining meat

This is evident from the materials, which include raw metal sheets, black steel and rebars. We even turned a seemingly problematic layout into an advantage, transforming bearing walls in narrow spaces into a vertical garden and a platform for a barbecue.

STK Restaurant in Olomouc, Czech Republic

Dominating the space are two huge steel bulls – the owner’s wish and a clear message to guests about the type of cuisine they should expect. In STK, heavy elements merge with nature. Willow branches wrap themselves around the tables and climb the walls, rising up to the ceiling and over the bulls’ heads.

STK Restaurant in Olomouc design by Komplits

Formed from solid oak boards, the tables have a rough hewn appearance and irregularly shaped steel legs. Here and there, plants spring from the ceiling and walls, changing the interior’s look with each new leaf that sprouts. Cowhide covering one of the walls and woven rope complete the signature style of the steakhouse.

Olomouc Steak Restaurant interior design
Olomouc Steak Restaurant interior design

Steak Restaurant Olomouc – Building Information

Studio: Komplits
Author: Pavel Kříž | principal architect
Contact e-mail: hello@komplits.com

Project location: Lipenská 11/7, Olomouc, Czech Republic
Project year: 2018
Completion yea: 2019
Usable floor area: 320 m2

Client: steak restaurant | http://www.steak-restaurant.cz | info@steak-restaurant.cz
Photo credits: BoysPlayNice | http://www.boysplaynice.com | info@boysplaynice.com

Olomouc Steak Restaurant interior design
Olomouc Steak Restaurant interior design
Olomouc Steak Restaurant bathroom mirrors washroom

About Komplits

Why do all houses, flats, offices, schools, hotels or tables out there look similar, when we have unlimited fantasy and possibilities? That was Komplits’ starting point, a belief uniting its members. They like exploring the roads not taken. A new day brings a new idea, shape or use of material. “But this is a material for fences! Well – we’ll make a chandelier from it”. Based in Olomouc, a city that encourages creativity, a team of architects, design and civil engineers take Pavel Kříž’s fantastic universes from paper and transform them into reality.

We create our own worlds. Houses, restaurants, schools, hotels and offices. But also desks, lighting, a bar or a hanger. One clear signature style and plenty of room for imagination. The more we hear something is impossible, the more excited we get about it.

Photography: BoysPlayNice | info@boysplaynice.com | www.boysplaynice.com

Source: https://www.e-architect.co.uk/czechrepublic/stk-restaurant-in-olomouc

Dark Green And Handsome Home Interiors- Nisha Designs

Dark green and handsome, these three home interiors each take a tall stand on style. The first two of our dreamy dark green interiors have an offbeat sort of edge. Hot pink accents burst onto the scene via outrageous wall art and unique art sculptures. Quirky personality particularly shines in the second of these, as a more colourful and patterned eclectic vibe builds. We finish up with a home more dedicated to the dark green scheme, with less distraction. Instead, we find luxe interludes of glossy white marble, and complete aesthetic cohesivity.

A pale grey cushiony sofa is given a pop of colour with an ochre accent cushion, which stands out brightly inside the shadowy room palette.
The neon pink accent is repeated in other art pieces in the home, like this one in the green kitchen. The hot hue makes an electrifying addition to the dark green decor scheme.
Differently shaped pendant shades make a glassy display above the dining island in the kitchen.
Concrete siding wraps the central island. The concrete builds a short splash screen around the kitchen sink, which protects the diners seated low on the opposite side of it.
A half-circle mirror opens up the end of the dark hallway. Chevron flooring points in the direction of the living room.
The green bedroom is dominated by a black 4 poster bed with a simple draped canopy. Monochrome art and bedclothes deepen the scheme.

VIA: http://www.home-designing.com/dark-green-and-handsome-home-interiors

Moroccan women collaborate with architecture students to design and build women’s community centre near Atlas Mountains from earth and stone

A small earthen village near the Atlas Mountains of Morocco is now home to a women’s community centre, designed and built by local women and a group …

Moroccan women collaborate with architecture students to design and build women’s community centre near Atlas Mountains from earth and stone

Upholstery fabric with purity technology- Nisha Designs

DELIGARD upholstery fabrics: unrivaled in cleanliness and easy maintenance. Bacteria, dirt and moisture don’t stand a chance with this pattented innovative system. In hotels, restaurants, retirement homes and clinics textiles create an especially relaxing atmosphere by reducing noise and spreading warmth and comfort. DELIGARD upholstery fabrics have a singular anti-dirt protection; they thus offer protection against contermination which is of great importance in highly frequented public areas. They are the solution for long-lasting stainless upholstery.

Each individual fiber is enclosed by a protective sheath, replacing the commonly used “shallow” surface coating found in other fabrics. The special layer on the reverse side prevents the penetration of moisture and wetness. This innovative technology provides lasting protection against impurities and dirt, and is easy to clean.

Brooks DELIGARD expands this successful series of upholstery fabrics. It is characterised by its discreet graphic pattern and a soft touch. With this combination it not only offers a discreet and modern look, but also gives rooms a cosy atmosphere.

Here is an overview of the DELIGARD characteristics: 

  • resistant to moisture and dirt
  • breathable
  • skin-friendly
  • prevents the growth of bacteria
  • hydrophobic
  • urine-resistant
  • disinfectant-resistant
  • extremely durable
  • environmentally friendly and pollutant-free
  • easy to upholster
  • particularly soft due to the textile reverse side
  • Flame-retardant properties: DIN EN 1021 Teil 1, DIN EN 1021 Teil 2, BS 5852 Crib 5, IMO Res. A652 (16)
  • Martindale: 30,000 Tours

Brooks Fabrics: https://www.delius-contract.de/en/products/contract-fabrics/brooks

Do you need samples or advice? Then send an e-mail to nisha@nishadesigns.com or call us at 702.622.8321

Morag Myerscough- her work brightens up space wherever it goes- Nisha Designs

Morag Myerscough is hugely passionate about what she does. Full of energy and full pelt into conversation as soon as I arrive at her London studio – though she admits a couple of coffees were involved – this is mostly her decompressing from presenting to a client that morning. She is passionate about what she does – but what is that? The labels graphic designer, designer and artist have variously been applied, but Myerscough doesn’t care to be labelled. Her website has no bio, and she has no business cards – much to the shock, she says, of a cohort of students she met recently. If you look at her work for clues, one of her best-known projects is a much-photographed wall in London’s new Design Museum, but others include the Temple of Agape on London’s Southbank, a ‘Belonging Bandstand’ that moved around Sussex, bedrooms for the Sheffield children’s hospital, and the 2015 Stirling Prize-winning project of Burntwood School that she collaborated on with architects AHMM.

The Temple of Agape. Image credit: Gareth Gardner

A project she has just presented was Mayfield in Manchester for developer U+I. Mayfield is a formerly derelict site in the process of being regenerated into a mixed-use development and public park. Myerscough’s large installation there displays the common traits in her work: it is a temporary, community-minded intervention in a public space, to be completed in a short deadline. Sceptics might see the combination of developer and artist as an exercise in ‘artwashing’, but there is a history of collaboration between her and Martyn Evans of U+I since a London community project, the Movement Cafe, completed in 2012. Myerscough is confident that what U+I is doing is positive, as ‘they do have a conscience’, and she is careful about who she works with, especially as she becomes better known and people approach her more and more. With developers, she says: ‘There’s always a level of moneymaking … but if you’re not displacing anyone or anything then I think it’s really important that places like Manchester get money put in them by different developers … because, obviously, if the European money gets taken away…’

There is a history of collaboration with U+I since a community project called the Movement Cafe. Image credit: Gareth Gardner

Just as she has to trust the client, they have to trust her. If they do, she ‘will go beyond – far and beyond’. With this trust – and with age too, says Myerscough – comes a sense of freedom and confidence. She no longer feels like a designer fulfilling a brief for a brand, as she explains: ‘Now I’m doing Mayfield, I’m not really responding to it being the brand or whatever; I’m responding to the social environment and all the people.’ It’s a more personal response, ‘a different space where it comes more from me’.

Despite having plenty of experience, Myerscough always looks critically at what she does. She believes it is very important for more established designers to relate to younger generations. With personal growth it can too easily be forgotten that the world is changing too: she talks about the ‘old-school’ and ‘male’ situations still being created by certain, older architecture and design figures, while outside of the industry she laments former prime minister Theresa May being ‘so old-fashioned [as a woman], so wrong in every way’.

One of the best-known projects is a much-photographed wall in London’s new Design Museum. Image credit: Gareth Gardner

Although she frequently collaborates with artist Luke Morgan, Myerscough is a one-woman studio, which she set up in 1993. How she defines herself and her work is important, and she remembers the confidence and ease with which her male peers would start out on their own (Thomas Heatherwick launched his eponymous studio around the same time). Their ease, and her discomfort, was due to rather entrenched attitudes in the industry about gender. She regrets the name slightly – choosing Studio Myerscough rather than Morag Myerscough in order to appear bigger and more established – because she still meets people who are either unable or unwilling to make the connection between her achievements and the studio’s. However, Myerscough prefers remaining on her own even as the projects grow: being the whole of Studio Myerscough gives her freedom with her ideas, time and ambitions, and fewer financial considerations as she hasn’t employees to pay.

Studio Myerscough. Image credit: Luke Morgan

Looking back at Myerscough’s career, you see where the various labels came from. Prior to the studio she studied graphic design, although she has never felt this reflected her work. Professionally, she has been employed as a designer – for Lamb & Shirley post-graduation and then as head of the graphics team for Memphis Group member Michele de Lucci in Milan – before coming back to begin Studio Myerscough. Its first project was a competition for a giant hoarding, which she entered and won with AHMM, and although she never wanted to be an architect the two have worked together on other jobs to much acclaim beside Burntwood School, such as the 2008 Stirling Prize-shortlisted Westminster Academy at the Naim Dangoor Centre, and a new installation in London’s Broadgate development. She was appointed a Royal Designer for Industry, but if she were to describe herself it would be as an artist.

The Belonging Bandstand in Brighton. Image credit: Morag Myerscough

What do you see in Myerscough’s work? For the unfamiliar it is eye-catching: colourful, often large in scale and in the public realm. You can sense her artistic background: her mother was a textile artist, her father a musician, and her family has roots in the circus. She says her penchant for temporary installations is due to the memory of the childhood thrill she felt when the circus came to town – bright colours and gaudy excitement where there was nothing before.

People can be scared of her neons and loud hues, but she uses her experience with colour to challenge those fears. For Sheffield’s children’s hospital the staff initially balked at her multicoloured designs, preferring ‘calming blue and green’. But once ‘they realised we weren’t trying to kill the children’ the mocked-up bedroom designs went down very well with the patients, parents and staff – and, as it turns out, teenagers particularly love orange.

For Sheffield’s children’s hospital the staff initially balked at the multicoloured designs. Image credit: Jill Tate

Sometimes you need to be shown things to understand: Myerscough talks about only realising some of her references for the Temple of Agape project upon walking through the erected structure (such as a temple she visited in India, where light entered beautifully through small openings in the walls).

Myerscough is interested in the difference between looking and seeing – one being passive, the other being active. This affects her approach to working with communities on public projects – considerable impact is made by how volunteers engage with the painting of the piece, able to see it after and say ‘I think I painted that bit’. On that same theme, a festival in Aberdeen called Look Again encouraged locals to reconsider a location in the city called Mercat Cross, which at that time was only frequented by drunks. The project had personal significance for Myerscough because Aberdeen was where her parents met and fell ‘in Love at First Sight’ – the name of the piece she produced for the festival. In among the brilliant team of women running the event, she felt her heritage more keenly than ever, seeing herself as she knew her mum – as a strong Scottish woman.

Myerscough may not like labels, but words are an important part of her work, often appearing large and readable from a distance. These words do not define but hope to provoke conversation. She often likes working with poets, and on Love at First Sight Jo Gilbert contributed with poetry in the local Doric dialect. Myerscough understands that people want to be recognised and appreciated for their unique knowledge and experience, but this can be a challenge for her original vision of a project. In Aberdeen the poem’s 300 words that needed painting were daunting, but Myerscough believes the point of collaboration isn’t to compromise.

Nor is it easy to work with large groups of volunteers rather than a dedicated, trained team, but the rewards are far more valuable, as volunteers treasure the experience. With every project Myerscough learns too – she tells me about how moved she was after a workshop with a blind school, as she never dreamed her work could reach beyond the visual in the way that it did, with the children making ‘incredible’ patterns with stickers and a grid.

At times during the interview I wish she would acknowledge the recognition that different groups want to give her – she inspires architects, designers, artists, nurses, patients, students and more, as their positive feedback testifies. Official accolades are rolling in too: a professorship at UCA Epsom, an honorary fellow at CSM, and a doctorate at Gloucester University, following one she received from Bournemouth, and on top of all this the appointment as a Royal Designer for Industry.

Open and enthusiastic, Myerscough’s heart is on her sleeve, but it is also on the painted surfaces of her work. She could be defined by her many labels and her many awards, but she is most confident in being defined by her work and the responses to it: colourful structures that light up spaces and the faces of those who visit them.

studiomyerscough.com

Words by Sophie Tolhurst