Spring Back Yard — Wyndesong Collectibles

Welcoming Spring with a few of my favorite things. I love springtime in my back yard when the plants are just beginning to show. Here in northern MI things are just beginning to pop out of the ground it is likely to be a few weeks still until there is color and spring greenery but…

Spring Back Yard — Wyndesong Collectibles

Upholstery fabric with purity technology- Nisha Designs

DELIGARD upholstery fabrics: unrivaled in cleanliness and easy maintenance. Bacteria, dirt and moisture don’t stand a chance with this pattented innovative system. In hotels, restaurants, retirement homes and clinics textiles create an especially relaxing atmosphere by reducing noise and spreading warmth and comfort. DELIGARD upholstery fabrics have a singular anti-dirt protection; they thus offer protection against contermination which is of great importance in highly frequented public areas. They are the solution for long-lasting stainless upholstery.

Each individual fiber is enclosed by a protective sheath, replacing the commonly used “shallow” surface coating found in other fabrics. The special layer on the reverse side prevents the penetration of moisture and wetness. This innovative technology provides lasting protection against impurities and dirt, and is easy to clean.

Brooks DELIGARD expands this successful series of upholstery fabrics. It is characterised by its discreet graphic pattern and a soft touch. With this combination it not only offers a discreet and modern look, but also gives rooms a cosy atmosphere.

Here is an overview of the DELIGARD characteristics: 

  • resistant to moisture and dirt
  • breathable
  • skin-friendly
  • prevents the growth of bacteria
  • hydrophobic
  • urine-resistant
  • disinfectant-resistant
  • extremely durable
  • environmentally friendly and pollutant-free
  • easy to upholster
  • particularly soft due to the textile reverse side
  • Flame-retardant properties: DIN EN 1021 Teil 1, DIN EN 1021 Teil 2, BS 5852 Crib 5, IMO Res. A652 (16)
  • Martindale: 30,000 Tours

Brooks Fabrics: https://www.delius-contract.de/en/products/contract-fabrics/brooks

Do you need samples or advice? Then send an e-mail to nisha@nishadesigns.com or call us at 702.622.8321

Morag Myerscough- her work brightens up space wherever it goes- Nisha Designs

Morag Myerscough is hugely passionate about what she does. Full of energy and full pelt into conversation as soon as I arrive at her London studio – though she admits a couple of coffees were involved – this is mostly her decompressing from presenting to a client that morning. She is passionate about what she does – but what is that? The labels graphic designer, designer and artist have variously been applied, but Myerscough doesn’t care to be labelled. Her website has no bio, and she has no business cards – much to the shock, she says, of a cohort of students she met recently. If you look at her work for clues, one of her best-known projects is a much-photographed wall in London’s new Design Museum, but others include the Temple of Agape on London’s Southbank, a ‘Belonging Bandstand’ that moved around Sussex, bedrooms for the Sheffield children’s hospital, and the 2015 Stirling Prize-winning project of Burntwood School that she collaborated on with architects AHMM.

The Temple of Agape. Image credit: Gareth Gardner

A project she has just presented was Mayfield in Manchester for developer U+I. Mayfield is a formerly derelict site in the process of being regenerated into a mixed-use development and public park. Myerscough’s large installation there displays the common traits in her work: it is a temporary, community-minded intervention in a public space, to be completed in a short deadline. Sceptics might see the combination of developer and artist as an exercise in ‘artwashing’, but there is a history of collaboration between her and Martyn Evans of U+I since a London community project, the Movement Cafe, completed in 2012. Myerscough is confident that what U+I is doing is positive, as ‘they do have a conscience’, and she is careful about who she works with, especially as she becomes better known and people approach her more and more. With developers, she says: ‘There’s always a level of moneymaking … but if you’re not displacing anyone or anything then I think it’s really important that places like Manchester get money put in them by different developers … because, obviously, if the European money gets taken away…’

There is a history of collaboration with U+I since a community project called the Movement Cafe. Image credit: Gareth Gardner

Just as she has to trust the client, they have to trust her. If they do, she ‘will go beyond – far and beyond’. With this trust – and with age too, says Myerscough – comes a sense of freedom and confidence. She no longer feels like a designer fulfilling a brief for a brand, as she explains: ‘Now I’m doing Mayfield, I’m not really responding to it being the brand or whatever; I’m responding to the social environment and all the people.’ It’s a more personal response, ‘a different space where it comes more from me’.

Despite having plenty of experience, Myerscough always looks critically at what she does. She believes it is very important for more established designers to relate to younger generations. With personal growth it can too easily be forgotten that the world is changing too: she talks about the ‘old-school’ and ‘male’ situations still being created by certain, older architecture and design figures, while outside of the industry she laments former prime minister Theresa May being ‘so old-fashioned [as a woman], so wrong in every way’.

One of the best-known projects is a much-photographed wall in London’s new Design Museum. Image credit: Gareth Gardner

Although she frequently collaborates with artist Luke Morgan, Myerscough is a one-woman studio, which she set up in 1993. How she defines herself and her work is important, and she remembers the confidence and ease with which her male peers would start out on their own (Thomas Heatherwick launched his eponymous studio around the same time). Their ease, and her discomfort, was due to rather entrenched attitudes in the industry about gender. She regrets the name slightly – choosing Studio Myerscough rather than Morag Myerscough in order to appear bigger and more established – because she still meets people who are either unable or unwilling to make the connection between her achievements and the studio’s. However, Myerscough prefers remaining on her own even as the projects grow: being the whole of Studio Myerscough gives her freedom with her ideas, time and ambitions, and fewer financial considerations as she hasn’t employees to pay.

Studio Myerscough. Image credit: Luke Morgan

Looking back at Myerscough’s career, you see where the various labels came from. Prior to the studio she studied graphic design, although she has never felt this reflected her work. Professionally, she has been employed as a designer – for Lamb & Shirley post-graduation and then as head of the graphics team for Memphis Group member Michele de Lucci in Milan – before coming back to begin Studio Myerscough. Its first project was a competition for a giant hoarding, which she entered and won with AHMM, and although she never wanted to be an architect the two have worked together on other jobs to much acclaim beside Burntwood School, such as the 2008 Stirling Prize-shortlisted Westminster Academy at the Naim Dangoor Centre, and a new installation in London’s Broadgate development. She was appointed a Royal Designer for Industry, but if she were to describe herself it would be as an artist.

The Belonging Bandstand in Brighton. Image credit: Morag Myerscough

What do you see in Myerscough’s work? For the unfamiliar it is eye-catching: colourful, often large in scale and in the public realm. You can sense her artistic background: her mother was a textile artist, her father a musician, and her family has roots in the circus. She says her penchant for temporary installations is due to the memory of the childhood thrill she felt when the circus came to town – bright colours and gaudy excitement where there was nothing before.

People can be scared of her neons and loud hues, but she uses her experience with colour to challenge those fears. For Sheffield’s children’s hospital the staff initially balked at her multicoloured designs, preferring ‘calming blue and green’. But once ‘they realised we weren’t trying to kill the children’ the mocked-up bedroom designs went down very well with the patients, parents and staff – and, as it turns out, teenagers particularly love orange.

For Sheffield’s children’s hospital the staff initially balked at the multicoloured designs. Image credit: Jill Tate

Sometimes you need to be shown things to understand: Myerscough talks about only realising some of her references for the Temple of Agape project upon walking through the erected structure (such as a temple she visited in India, where light entered beautifully through small openings in the walls).

Myerscough is interested in the difference between looking and seeing – one being passive, the other being active. This affects her approach to working with communities on public projects – considerable impact is made by how volunteers engage with the painting of the piece, able to see it after and say ‘I think I painted that bit’. On that same theme, a festival in Aberdeen called Look Again encouraged locals to reconsider a location in the city called Mercat Cross, which at that time was only frequented by drunks. The project had personal significance for Myerscough because Aberdeen was where her parents met and fell ‘in Love at First Sight’ – the name of the piece she produced for the festival. In among the brilliant team of women running the event, she felt her heritage more keenly than ever, seeing herself as she knew her mum – as a strong Scottish woman.

Myerscough may not like labels, but words are an important part of her work, often appearing large and readable from a distance. These words do not define but hope to provoke conversation. She often likes working with poets, and on Love at First Sight Jo Gilbert contributed with poetry in the local Doric dialect. Myerscough understands that people want to be recognised and appreciated for their unique knowledge and experience, but this can be a challenge for her original vision of a project. In Aberdeen the poem’s 300 words that needed painting were daunting, but Myerscough believes the point of collaboration isn’t to compromise.

Nor is it easy to work with large groups of volunteers rather than a dedicated, trained team, but the rewards are far more valuable, as volunteers treasure the experience. With every project Myerscough learns too – she tells me about how moved she was after a workshop with a blind school, as she never dreamed her work could reach beyond the visual in the way that it did, with the children making ‘incredible’ patterns with stickers and a grid.

At times during the interview I wish she would acknowledge the recognition that different groups want to give her – she inspires architects, designers, artists, nurses, patients, students and more, as their positive feedback testifies. Official accolades are rolling in too: a professorship at UCA Epsom, an honorary fellow at CSM, and a doctorate at Gloucester University, following one she received from Bournemouth, and on top of all this the appointment as a Royal Designer for Industry.

Open and enthusiastic, Myerscough’s heart is on her sleeve, but it is also on the painted surfaces of her work. She could be defined by her many labels and her many awards, but she is most confident in being defined by her work and the responses to it: colourful structures that light up spaces and the faces of those who visit them.

studiomyerscough.com

Words by Sophie Tolhurst

9 Places in Europe Where You Can Sleep in a Bubble- Nisha Designs

Want to sleep in a bubble? If so, I’ve selected 9 places where you can do just that while surrounded by pristine countryside, enchanted forests, or the Spanish desert.

Designed to embrace the great outdoors, these cool bubble rooms are available in various locations throughout Europe and let you fall asleep while gazing at the starry sky.

Hotel Aire de Bardenas, Spain

Desert Bubble Room

Nestled in the Bardenas Reales Natural Park, the design-forward Aire de Bardenas hotel offers visitors the opportunity to sleep under the moonlight in beautifully decorated bubble rooms with endless views of the stunning desert landscape. The chic spherical structures are connected by bubble tunnels and come appointed with bathroom, electricity, Wi-Fi, and a minibar.

Forest Domes, Northern Ireland

Forest Dome

Escape the outside world with a stay at Finn Lough, a gorgeous lakeside resort offering deluxe bubble accommodation in County Fermanagh, Northern Ireland. Each elegant Forest Dome is stylishly decorated with a bespoke four-poster bed, as well as classy period armchairs and a telescope for stargazing in style. All units come with ensuite bathrooms, Nespresso coffee machines, and 180° transparent walls, immersing guests in the wild surroundings.

The 5 Million Star Hotel, Iceland

Winter dome

There’s no better way to experience the Northern Lights in Iceland than by staying at Buubble, aka The 5 Million Star Hotel. Tucked away in the middle of a secret forest, about 1.5 – 2 hours from Reykjavik, the establishment offers adventurers a variety of bubbles to choose from, all equipped with heating systems, power outlets, and cozy beds to gaze at the starry sky in comfort. Come summer, the Midnight Sun brings the dormant nature to life, painting everything around in vibrant shades of green.

Dome Garden, UK

Dome with suspended tents

For a chic back-to-nature getaway in Gloucestershire, look no further than Dome Garden, a futuristic hamlet of 11 eco-friendly dome tents set deep in the Forest of Dean. Often referred to as one of the best glamping sites in the UK, the luxury camping village combines the joys of outdoor life with the comfort and amenities of an upscale hotel. Expect cavelike Hobbity domes, flying beds, entertaining pizza nights, and lots of adventure opportunities right on your doorstep.

ATTRAP’RÊVES, France

Bubble Hotel

Luxury meets outdoor living at ATTRAP’RÊVES, a unique bubble hotel tucked away in the picturesque countryside of Marseille. Here, guests are invited to sleep beneath the stars in inflatable plastic bubbles created by French designer Pierre-Stephane Dumas and furnished with king-sized beds. Each individually decorated unit is conveniently secluded and comes with a completely opaque bathroom and a telescope for stargazing.

Dihan Evasion, France

Bubble Tent

Dihan Evasion, a quirky family farm in Brittany, lets you spend the night in bubble tents suspended in the hundred-year-old oak and chestnut trees between Carnac and Quiberon, in the Morbihan department. Accessed via ladders, the transparent spheres come with large round mattresses and curtains for a private, comfortable night under the stars. Needless to say, they’re all made of plastic glass, allowing guests to fully enjoy the peaceful wooded surroundings.

Camp Kátur, England

Glamping in a dome

If you are in search of a unique glamping experience in the UK, look no further than Camp Kátur. Situated within Camp Hill Manor Estate, in the rolling countryside of North Yorkshire, the campsite offers an interesting mix of accommodation options, including some unique 360-degree panoramic Unidomes hidden in the woods. This type of unit includes a double bed draped in sheepskin rugs, romantic lanterns, and a gas heater to keep you warm and cozy on cool nights. Outfitted with BBQ, fire pit, table, and chairs, the deck outside is a great spot to just sit and relax while taking in the sights and sounds around you.

Nuit Nature, France

Bubble Room

A stay in the bulle at Nuit Nature comes with champagne tasting, complimentary breakfast, and magnificent views of Mont Blanc. Situated in the mountain village of Combloux, the bubble is beautifully fitted with designer furniture and offers a comfortable bed for a memorable night’s sleep outside in the French Alps.

Maison Bulles, France

Maison Bulles, France

As if vacationing in Provence isn’t special enough, how about sleeping in a bubble overnight? In the heights of Pont-Saint-Esprit, surrounded by bucolic countryside panoramas, nestles Maison Bulles, a one-of-a-kind lodge where rooms come in the form of transparent, individually themed bubbles. The most special of them is Mercure, which has fiery red decor details and its own private Jacuzzi. Otherwise, all dome-like structures come equipped with comfortable bedding for two and heating mattresses for cooler evenings.

Via: https://travelaway.me/sleep-in-a-bubble/

Home Decor Trends You Need To Follow For 2020 — Society19 — Wyndesong Collectibles

It’s 2020, which means it’s time to get rid of the old and get down with the new! From floral wallpaper to colored cabinets, from vintage accents to earthy decor, here are the home decor trends you need to follow for 2020. 1. Non-White Kitchens There is something to be said about having an all-white… via…

Home Decor Trends You Need To Follow For 2020 — Society19 — Wyndesong Collectibles

Easy and Inexpensive Ways To Give Your Bedroom A Makeover — Society19 — Wyndesong Collectibles

If you’re looking for something to do, or feel like your life needs a slight change, then rearranging or giving your bedroom a little facelift is always definitely what you should do. But, you don’t want to spend tons of money or even take tones of time. I mean, you want to enjoy your updated… via…

Easy and Inexpensive Ways To Give Your Bedroom A Makeover — Society19 — Wyndesong Collectibles

Spiritual First Aid Kit- Nishante- Nisha Designs

SPIRITUAL FIRST AID KIT- A lifestyle kit. What you can do at home to raise the psi vibration of your home and continuously cleanse your space from negativity. Even though you are not meeting anyone or seeing anyone your inner negative and energy of everyone, social media can still affect you physically, emotionally, mentally, spiritually and psychically does not matter if you have people in your space or not. Keeping your home clean of this energy is a must.

Clear, protect, shield: if you don’t know how to do this message me and we can work out a minimal cost and customize your clearing, shielding, protecting for you, your home, work, kids, business, everything and everyone.


Meditate: if you don’t have a practice or want some guidance message me and we can work something out and teach you some simple ways to get you started or what you need to focus and how to feel your energy and up your game to get you, your body to a calm relaxed space.


Stretch, Quigong, Yoga, Tai Chi: There are online YouTube videos where you can do your yoga, tai chi whatever you do it’s all available online.

Mantras : listen and put on ‘Om Mani Padme Om”- you will find it on YouTube for 10 hours. Put it on continuously. It will clean all negative energies in your space.


Incense: Always have and continuously burn Sage, Dragons Blood, myrrh, patchouli, sandalwood, camphor in your home at all times.


Crystals: Have crystals in your home to protect and raise the psi vibration of your space.


Herbs, Essential Oils, Candles: Your herbs you use to make your food have magickal properties. Message me how to work with them magickally.


Color Therapy: Wear colors that lift your energy. Drink colored water. To know more message me.


Read, watch stories that are comic, light hearted. Excersice your imagination, visualize, affirm, think, speak good positivity words and thoughts from your heart. Practice being real, honest with yourself and others, speak your truth without fear.

Whatever you do do it from your heart always❤️or don’t do it.

Spiritual Resources: https://www.crystal-dawn.net; https://crystal-dawn.com; https://ravenhawksmagazine.net;

Queries: Nisha Desai at Contact@nishante.com

Quebec-based Hintercabin connecting guests with nature and minimalism and gifting the planet 10 trees planted with every booking

Hintercabin, a Scandinavian-inspired lakefront cabin in Quebec, is enabling guests to connect with nature and minimalism while also helping to save the planet, given that for every booking made at the sustainable cabin, the company plant 10 trees.

The cabin, which is located in La Conception, was created with simplicity or “hygge” in mind, encouraging living simply and minimally. A modular design, with bare wooden floors and a neutral colour scheme, it is sparsely furnished but simultaneously offers everything needed for a comfortable stay.

Hinter, who designed the sustainable cabin, said the minimalist cabin is their “take on what a hotel ‘room’ should be. The floor-to-ceiling windows that wrap around the house invite nature in as much as it serves as an “open window” for guests to connect with nature.

A 15-minute drive from the well-known ski resort of Mont-Tremblant, Hintercabin’s remote location is close to many nature parks and trails. The cabin, which sleeps up to four people, also features a private dock and access to the lake, as well as a canoe available mid-spring to mid-fall.

Hinter, who describe their purpose as the creation of “spaces where design, architecture, and nature become one”, also sell minimalist-style interior and furniture products via their website, all created with simplicity and sustainability in mind using sustainable wood. As with every booking made at Hintercabin, Hinter also plant 10 trees for every interior product it sells via its website.

Hinter say: “While your wellness is a high priority, we recognise that our planet needs help. Neutrality is not enough. We want to set a new norm on sustainability by giving more than what we take. Companies should be giving more than they take. That in mind, we plant 10 trees for every booking, for every object sold and we work only with companies that have the environment as their number one priority. We seek like-minded companies that share our beliefs so we can run eco-friendly spaces with sustainably-made products.”

In addition to Hintercabin, Hinter’s roster of spaces also includes Hinterhouse. Inspired by cabins in the Norwegian mountains and using Japanese design cues and minimalism philosophy, Hinterhouse is made of 60% glass to ensure that whether guests are outside in the woods or taking comfort inside, they remain close to nature.

Hinter

Rosa Medea is Life & Soul Magazine’s Chief. She writes about lifestyle including sustainable and green living. She also offers content services to businesses and individuals at Rosamedea.com

DELITHERM®- Our textile contribution towards reducing CO2 emissions-Nisha Designs

The range of our functional DELITHERM® fabrics is expanding. With two new articles the selection is widened. Delitherm® fabrics are energy savers both in the summer and in the winter. In the summer the drawn curtains reduce solar radiation by up to 55% and prevent the extreme heating up of rooms. Equally, in the winter Delitherm® prevents the loss of heat through the window and keeps the heating in the room. One can save up to 15% of heating cost.

PHOS DELITHERM®

The two-coloured melange yarn, which produces a horizontal pattern, gives Phos a warm look. Phos DELITHERM® is available in 4 neutral colours.

EOS DELITHERM®

Eos DELITHERM® has a smooth, closed surface and is available in white.

  • DELITHERM® fabrics are usable as:
  • sheers
  • curtains
  • linings
  • roman blinds
  • panels
     
  • DELITHERM® summarised briefly:
  • energy saving thanks to the reflection of light rays and heat
  • reduction of CO2 emissions
  • washable at 30°
  • soft drape
  • hard wearing in daily use; unlike with coated sun protection qualities there are no crease folds

For more information please email nisha@nishadesigns.com or call 702.622.8321

Mjøstårnet: World’s tallest timber building symbolises “green shift” to carbon-absorbing sustainable design — Life & Soul Magazine

Brumunddal in forest-rich Norway is a rural town with a major forestry and wood processing industry, which now boasts the world’s tallest timber building – the 85.4m high Mjøstårnet (The Mjøsa Tower). The 18-storey mixed-use building, which overlooks Lake Mjøsa in Brumunddal, contains apartments, the Wood Hotel, swimming pool, office space, and a restaurant. Opened […]

Mjøstårnet: World’s tallest timber building symbolises “green shift” to carbon-absorbing sustainable design — Life & Soul Magazine