Weekly Spiritual Energy Guidance- October 12-16,2020- Lady Dyanna- Nisha Designs

The energy this week reminds you that you live in an increasingly global community. Your modern technology has made it possible for you to communicate instantly among yourselves, no matter where in the world you are. Whether you like it or not, you are all connected to one another. As Chief Seattle said, “Man did not weave the web of life. He is merely a strand in it. Whatever he does to the web, he does to himself.” You are more closely connected in “the web of life” than ever before in human history. And therefore, now – more than ever before – what even a single individual among you does affects every other human on the planet. The good of one is the good of all. The willingness to allow the differences while compassionately working toward the common good is the goal here. Fighting against the differences will only ensure more divisiveness. Accepting the differences while sincerely wanting the highest good for all is the only way you will ever ensure a truly connected world. A world where all are equal, all are accepted. A world where there truly is a sense of community.

Affirmation: I am aware that the good of one is the good of all.

Upholstery fabric with purity technology- Nisha Designs

DELIGARD upholstery fabrics: unrivaled in cleanliness and easy maintenance. Bacteria, dirt and moisture don’t stand a chance with this pattented innovative system. In hotels, restaurants, retirement homes and clinics textiles create an especially relaxing atmosphere by reducing noise and spreading warmth and comfort. DELIGARD upholstery fabrics have a singular anti-dirt protection; they thus offer protection against contermination which is of great importance in highly frequented public areas. They are the solution for long-lasting stainless upholstery.

Each individual fiber is enclosed by a protective sheath, replacing the commonly used “shallow” surface coating found in other fabrics. The special layer on the reverse side prevents the penetration of moisture and wetness. This innovative technology provides lasting protection against impurities and dirt, and is easy to clean.

Brooks DELIGARD expands this successful series of upholstery fabrics. It is characterised by its discreet graphic pattern and a soft touch. With this combination it not only offers a discreet and modern look, but also gives rooms a cosy atmosphere.

Here is an overview of the DELIGARD characteristics: 

  • resistant to moisture and dirt
  • breathable
  • skin-friendly
  • prevents the growth of bacteria
  • hydrophobic
  • urine-resistant
  • disinfectant-resistant
  • extremely durable
  • environmentally friendly and pollutant-free
  • easy to upholster
  • particularly soft due to the textile reverse side
  • Flame-retardant properties: DIN EN 1021 Teil 1, DIN EN 1021 Teil 2, BS 5852 Crib 5, IMO Res. A652 (16)
  • Martindale: 30,000 Tours

Brooks Fabrics: https://www.delius-contract.de/en/products/contract-fabrics/brooks

Do you need samples or advice? Then send an e-mail to nisha@nishadesigns.com or call us at 702.622.8321

ClimateVoice: New initiative aims to mobilise workers to urge companies for tougher policies to fight climate change

A new climate change initiative, ClimateVoice, has launched to help employees at big companies press their bosses for more aggressive policies to fight climate change.

The organisation, led by former Google and Facebook sustainability chief Bill Weihl, is designed to mobilise the workforce to urge companies to go “all in” on climate, both in business practices and policy advocacy.

Students preparing to enter the workforce and current employees will be invited to take the ClimateVoice Pledge, to leverage their influence to urge companies to go #AllinOnClimate. Those making the Pledge will get action updates and tools they can use to raise the climate issue with employers.

Launching the initiative at the ClimateCAP conference in Virginia last month, Bill Weihl said: “America’s corporate sector has the power to disrupt climate change and put us on a path of steep carbon reductions.

“Many companies are doing great sustainability work in their operations, and some are speaking up – but not enough of them, and not often enough. Silence is no longer an option. ClimateVoice is mobilising the power of the workforce to activate companies to raise their voice in climate policy battles.

“Unleashing the muscle of the corporate sector will be a climate game changer, tipping the balance on policy battles that are now stacked in favor of polluting industries. We invite all current and future employees to visit us at climatevoice.org and take the ClimateVoice Pledge.”

ClimateVoice has announced three policy focus areas for its launch. The Virginia Clean Economy Act (VCEA) would make Virginia a leader on climate, and ClimateVoice is urging action before the close of the legislative session in March. In Illinois, ClimateVoice is calling on workers and companies to back the state’s pending Clean Energy Jobs Act (CEJA). ClimateVoice will also focus on the Transportation and Climate Initiative (TCI), a regional effort aimed at reducing transportation emissions in the Northeast and Mid-Atlantic states.

Over the next few months, ClimateVoice will be engaging students and activists at a series of climate-related events across the US, including the GoGreen conference in Seattle next month.

Rosa Medea is Life & Soul Magazine’s Chief. She writes about lifestyle including sustainable and green living. She also offers content services to businesses and individuals at Rosamedea.com

Gaia Mission, a new Chrome extension and search engine, helping to restore Earth’s ecosystems one search at a time — Life & Soul Magazine — ravenhawks’ magazine

Gaia Mission is a a Chrome extension and search engine that enables users to generate revenue towards the protection and preservation of natural resources and wildlife with every click. The Montreal-based search engine has partnered with Rainforest Trust to support the protection of rainforests, coral reefs, oceans, wildlife, tree planting, and animals. Gaia Mission has […]

Gaia Mission, a new Chrome extension and search engine, helping to restore Earth’s ecosystems one search at a time — Life & Soul Magazine — ravenhawks’ magazine

The Pollinators — Graffiti Lux Art & More

Life & Soul Magazine

This sweet mural by Nick Sweetman, is an awareness tribute, … to some of the most important pollinators on our planet. The mural turns 3 corners. I will do my best to show it left to right. The above shot was taken from across the street. Cars, vans, trucks and busses dominated 19 of the […]

via The Pollinators — Graffiti Lux Art & More

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Design and Architecture vs. Climate Change: What Does the Future Bring — ecogreenlove

Green living doesn’t have to look (or cost) like something out of a sci-fi movie. Today, there is a vast availability of ecological materials that can keep inhabitants safe while contributing to minimized pollution. Combined with modern design solutions, they’re helping create aesthetically pleasing homes in which families can live comfortably and sustainably.

via Design and Architecture vs. Climate Change: What Does the Future Bring — ecogreenlove

Denilson Baniwa: Indigenous artist fusing native references with non-native to communicate the thinking and struggle of his people in Brazil

Visual artist Denilson Baniwa is using art to communicate the thinking and struggle of indigenous people in Brazil and around the world today by mixing traditional and contemporary indigenous references with western, non-indigenous references throughout his artworks.

Denilson Baniwa of the Baniwa indigenous people uses canvas, installations, digital media and performances to highlight the experience of being indigenous in present times.

A native of the Rio Negro in the Brazilian Amazon, the artist, who currently resides in Niterói, incorporates graphics, animals and references to Baniwa life and cosmology with western cultural references such as pop art, Hollywood, and “popular” culture.

Among his artworks are iconic images of Mona Lisa and Queen Elizabeth II with tribal markings. He illustrates the coming together of native with non-native species in a colourful artwork, entitled Diabetes, where a young indigenous man is drinking a can of Coca Cola, highlighting the harm caused through non-native things including products and people.

As a youth, Denilson Baniwa engaged in the struggle for the rights of indigenous peoples and moved through the non-indigenous universe, seizing references that would strengthen their resistance.

His artworks always highlight the plight of indigenous people and animals, including the jaguar, and the artist also uses his art to highlight the damage being caused by the likes of agribusiness and the current Brazilian president Bolsonaro’s position on mining on indigenous lands.

In a digital media performance entitled Azougue 80, the artist eats artificial fishing lures from a plate next to a glass full of mercury (called azougue in Portuguese), the poisonous metal used in gold prospecting that contaminates rivers, including those in the Yanomami indigenous territory. In the background, there’s a soundtrack of Bolsonaro chatting with someone, praising gold prospecting and comparing it to fishing.

In an interview with IHU, Denilson Baniwa said: “We are living in that time where the destruction of human beings is very likely, because we are destroying everything that we find ahead: the oceans full of garbage, the forests that have become lifeless pastures, the polluted cities, the diseases that are derived from the style current life, the violence caused by the maintenance of power.

“It is likely that this world will end soon, if we are not more aware. The good news is that right after the destruction, there will be a renewal where the world itself will heal itself, because the world’s poison is the human being, where all sorts of evil resides.”

Images Credit: Denilson Baniwa

Denilson Baniwa

Rosa Medea is Life & Soul Magazine’s Chief. She writes about lifestyles including sustainable and green living. She also offers content services to businesses and individuals at Rosamedea.com

Around the World in 80 Eco Spas: Banasura Hill Resort, Kerala, India

Life & Soul Magazine’s Travel Guide to Eco Spas will whet your appetite for a vacation that brings healing to holidaymakers in accommodations that work in harmony with the planet.

21. Banasura Hill Resort, Kerala, India

One of India’s greenest resort and spas, Banasura Hill Resort, is applauded for being the largest “earth” resort in the country.

Constructed entirely from natural materials – mainly mud known as rammed earth, recycled wood, and bamboo and coconut palm leaf roofs, Banasura Hill Resort sits some 3500 ft above sea level nestled on a 35-acre eco-friendly farm in Kerala’s Wayanad district.

The earthly, rustic charm of the resort, constructed using mud excavated from the very site that it stands on, blends harmoniously with its lush green surroundings which include gushing mountain streams, spectacular waterfalls, and coffee, tea, pepper and cashew plantations.

Using sustainable archictecture techniques, “earth” architecture was chosen in the building of Banasura Hill Resort as it would cause the least amount of ecological damage in this biodiversity hotspot, which is part of the Western Ghats UNESCO World Heritage Site. With its mountainous range sprawling with forests, the Western Ghats is believed to be older than the Himalayas, and indigenous tribes of the region have long been familiar with the rammed earth method of building.

An indigenous tribe from the nearby Kurichiya village played a significant role in contributing their skill and expertise in the construction of Banasura Hill Resort, including creating a bio-fence by planting thousands of bamboos of different varieties around the resort’s perimeter.

Since Banasura Hill Resort stands in the middle of a tropical forest, all views from the resort’s naturally cooled earth huts and cottages are awe-inspiring, including a view of Banasura Hill which looms majestically behind the resort. The natural terracotta-coloured walls of the accommodations are largely left bare so guests can marvel at the craftsmanship gone into Banasura Hill Resort, while bamboo furnishings enhance the natural look and feel.

The resort also has a rejuvenating Ayurvedic spa where guests can experience massages which make use of traditional herbal preparations and medicated oils. It also has an outdoor pool.

Banasura is committed to sustainable practices throughout its operations including harvesting rainwater, and a biogas plant which recycles organic waste into manure and kitchen fuel.

Banasura Hill Resort is likely to appeal to people of all ages, however it’s nature lovers that are to benefit the most from a stay at the Kerala-based resort given that stunning greenery such as cascading waterfalls, plantations, caves and a national park is “on your doorstep”.

Images source: Banasura Hill Resort Facebook page

Banasura Hill Resort

Rosa Medea is Life & Soul Magazine’s Chief. She writes about lifestyles including sustainable and green living. She also offers content services to businesses and individuals at Rosamedea.com

The Brighton Waste House: A blueprint for public buildings made almost entirely from waste

The Brighton Waste House – made from 20,000 toothbrushes, 4,000 DVD cases, two tonnes of denim jeans, 2,000 floppy discs, 2,000 used carpet tiles, and construction waste – continues to inspire six years after it was constructed.

A permanent building, the award-winning waste house, designed by the architect and University of Brighton lecturer Duncan Baker-Brown, was opened in June 2014 and continues to be a “live” on-going research project and design workshop.

Situated on campus at The University of Brighton’s College for Arts & Humanities in the South of England, The Brighton Waste House was constructed from approximately 90% waste, including surplus material and discarded plastic gathered from the construction industries and homes.

In the construction of the Waste House, 10 tonnes of chalk waste and 10% of clay was used to create a rammed chalk wall. Rammed earth can contribute to the overall energy-efficiency of buildings. The density, thickness and thermal conductivity of rammed earth make it a particularly suitable material for storing passive solar energy as well as that given off by occupants of the building.

The “carbon negative” building, which was built by students and volunteers, also draws attention to the huge environmental consequences of throwing away everyday domestic objects. Therefore the Waste House also “locks away” other sources of waste material, such as duvets, toothbrushes, music cassettes and old plastic razors, that were slotted into wall cavities to help with insulation in the house.

Now an open design research studio, the Brighton Waste House is also available to schools, colleges and community groups for “green” themed events.

Image Credits: The Brighton Waste House and BBM Sustainable Design Limited

The Brighton Waste House

Rosa Medea is Life & Soul Magazine’s Chief. She writes about lifestyles including sustainable and green living. She also offers content services to businesses and individuals at Rosamedea.com

Giraffe Manor: Guests get up close with Rothschild giraffes at conservation-supporting boutique hotel- Life & Soul Magazine

There’s few boutique hotels in the world that can lay claim to visitors rubbing shoulders with giraffes over the breakfast table other than Kenya’s Giraffe Manor.

Giraffe Manor, set in 12 acres of private land within 140 acres of indigenous forest in the Langata suburb of Nairobi, is a wonderful and delightful vacation for anyone who has an affinity with the graceful and elegant mammals that are giraffes, namely the Rothschild species.

The boutique hotel, which is situated at one end of land used as a sanctuary by the Africa Fund for Endangered Wildlife for this rare species of giraffe, is often visited by a herd of Rothschild giraffes morning and evening, who sometimes poke their long necks into the windows of the dining room in the hope of a treat, before retreating to their forest sanctuary.

The giraffes are nurtured within the 140 acres of the estate, until they are ready to be reintroduced into the wilds of safer National Parks and game reserves wherever possible.

The Rothschild giraffe is one of the most endangered species of giraffe with under 2000 estimated to be left in the wild in 2016. One of the tallest giraffes, the Rothschild giraffe can grow to 19 feet in height and weigh about 2,500 pounds, with the males weighing more than the females by several hundred pounds.

Giraffe Manor, an English-style country mansion, has been supporting the conservation of the Rothschild giraffe since the 1970s when the then owners Jock and Betty Leslie-Melville first adopted an orphaned Rothschild giraffe, Daisy.

Now owned by The Safari Collection, Giraffe Manor has become a world-renowned boutique hotel, with 12 rooms offering guests old country house charm. Managed like a family home, dinner is served at a long table in the dining room, and after drinks served by the fire on the terrace overlooking the rolling lawns.

The Safari Collection supports several initiatives that protect local wildlife, including the Mara Cheetah Project, and operate sustainable practices throughout its portfolio of hotels aimed at reduce its  energy, water and materials and emissions.

A popular place to stay in Kenya, mainly because of its resident four-legged friends, Giraffe Manor recommends booking 1-2 years in advance prior to travel.

Images Credit: Giraffe Manor

Giraffe Manor

Rosa Medea is Life & Soul Magazine’s Chief. She writes about lifestyles including sustainable and green living. She also offers content services to businesses and individuals at Rosamedea.com

Meltdown: Exhibition emphasises the changing global climate and the importance of glaciers- Life & Soul Magazine

A series of artworks emphasising the changing global climate and the importance of glaciers is currently on display at London’s Horniman Museum.

The temporary exhibition, entitled Meltdown, aims to emphasise the importance of glaciers in a scientific, illustrative and dramatic way. The show features work from every relevant continent, leading the viewer on a journey in three chapters – The Importance of Glaciers, Current Issues and Meltdown Consequences.

Among the works include artist Peter Funch’s use of vintage postcards as a model for his images of American glaciers to capture the effects of glacial recession; Norfolk + Thymann’s images of part of the Rhône glacier covered in geo-thermal cloth to limit melting; Richard Mosse’s photograph of the ice cave under the Vatnajökull glacier in Iceland; and Noémie Goudal’s large-scale photographic installation mirroring the shifting glacial landscape, printed on biodegradable paper.

The exhibition – organised by climate change charity, Project Pressure – is on until 12 January.

Project Pressure, since 2008, has been commissioning world-renowned artists to conduct expeditions to document changes to the world’s vanishing glaciers, the consequences for billions of people, and efforts made to limit melting.

Meltdown

Rosa Medea is Life & Soul Magazine’s Chief. She writes about lifestyles including sustainable and green living. She also offers content services to businesses and individuals at Rosamedea.com