Artist Bakes Lifelike ‘Succulent Cakes’ That Turn Prickly Plants Into Delicious Desserts- Nisha Designs

If you’re ready for the blistering cold to end, you’re not alone. We’ve found the perfect Springtime cakes that incorporate succulents and florals to make a decadent cake you’ll not only want to devour but simply can’t take your eyes off of.

Ivenovan, based in Jakarta, is the masterful bakery shop behind these succulent cupcakes and cakes made of buttercream frosting, powdered sugar, and food coloring.

The ultra-realistic floral cakes feature vines, leaves, needles, flowers, cacti, and other blooms that make for some of the most gorgeous cakes we’ve ever seen.

And the funny thing is, Ivenoven got its start with sugar cookies and a family’s passion for baking that was passed down to the next generation: a goddaughter.

“My baking passion and journey started one fine day when I was sneaking around in my godma’s house trying to look for her baking recipes, and maybe, just maybe, bring the recipes back home for my own collection,” write Ivenoven on their blog.

The bakery got its start in 2013 and originally began with cookies. The passion for baking and design grew robust and propelled the bakery into artisan cakes and treats becoming bigger every day.

What’s makes this bakery even better is the fact that all of the premium ingredients are sourced locally and internationally to preserve quality.

Ivenoven has attracted thousands of followers on Instagram from all over the world praising the cakes and begging for a stateside bakery who can replicate the work of this special bakery.

Source: https://canyouactually.com/succulent-cupcakes-and-cakes/

Senegal’s first female graffiti artist Dieynaba Sidibe using art to speak out about women’s rights and the environment — Life & Soul Magazine

Senegal’s first female graffiti artist, Dieynaba Sidibe is breaking down barriers in the world of street art and challenging perceptions of females. Painting under the name Zienixx, Dieynaba Sidibe uses her art to promote women’s rights, to speak out on social and environmental issues, and to raise awareness about women’s health. Dieynaba Sidibe said: “All […]

Senegal’s first female graffiti artist Dieynaba Sidibe using art to speak out about women’s rights and the environment — Life & Soul Magazine

Brazilian performance artist dressing as an extension of earth and nature teaches kids about conservation in the Amazon — Life & Soul Magazine

Artist and activist Emerson Munduruku is teaching environmental conservation to children in Brazil through performance art under the guise of his his drag queen alter ego, Uýra Sodoma. Emerson Munduruku takes part in educational projects, teaching children about Amazon communities and how to both connect with and protect nature. His aim is to pass on […]

Brazilian performance artist dressing as an extension of earth and nature teaches kids about conservation in the Amazon — Life & Soul Magazine

Storytelling- L’Atelier Du Pastel and Colors- Artist Within- Nisha Designs

This video reminded me of an interesting project that was given to me to work on. A time when I moved from South Carolina to California back in 2003/2004 to start a new job. Young and filled with possibilities took a leap of faith and joined a high end designer in California to design his textile collection. He had an array of rich textiles from all over the world. It had been about 2 years since my graduation from Savannah College of Art and Design, very eager and excited to learn my way through the shades of textiles.

He had a screen printing facility in house. And back in time hand screen printing, making your own screens, huge printing tables were a big thing. Still maybe alive but not as much as it used to be back in the days. And my first assignment was to create 2 complete set of Pantone swatches with the screen printing pigment dyes on fabric. Kinda creating a fabric Pantone book/ binder for his library. Ha! Yup it was quite a task on hand. There were 2000 colors I had to create and print on a fabric and note the values of how I got that color. All I could think to myself is “what”? You want me to create these 2000 colors? My monkey mind got real busy with all kinds of stupid negative thoughts. But I was excited to be there and learn so I did not let my monkey mind override the truth. And the truth was I loved the opportunity given to me and if this is how it starts then so be it. Pulled myself together and got back on mixing colors. And it was a beautiful project. Easy, effortless and fun. In the beginning it was slow but as I started to understand the medium and the craft of making colors the task became fun, play and meditative.

Everyday from morning to evening for quite many months all I did was mix colors, until I reached a point to perfect the art of knowing colors and when and how much to add or subtract to get the desired shade or tint.

This practice, knowledge gave me insight into color and color making. The reason I share this as it has taught me a very valuable lesson. Lesson of being persistent and consistent, not to loose hope or to give up just because of what you think you should be doing or not doing in your mind. No job is small or big. No matter at that moment and time you don’t realize the value it is bringing you but hang on and walk through that project. You will be grateful for this task you were given to do. Every job/ task has a meaning, purpose. And it is given to you because only you could do it. And there is no one like you. Even though at first it looked like a huge task but if it wasn’t for this exercise I would have missed learning the importance of colors and it’s journey.

By the time I was done I did of course truly enjoyed the joy of colors. It was meditative, fun, soothing and healing for me. Every color has its own magickal presence, Vibration, vitality, strength and personality.

Matter of fact every task, job that I was given no matter how hard or easy the boss was or the task was it led me to connecting me to my trueself. My artist within. It is an opportunity for you to grow and know yourself within.

Your past has no power over the present moment- Eckhart Tolle- Soul Nishante- Nisha Designs

“The past has no power over the present moment”- Eckhart Tolle.

It takes commitment to be in the Now. It takes commitment from you for you to experience the Now. It takes commitment to be still, to relax, slow down. It takes being persistent and consistent. It takes desire, will power and focus every moment, every day to be in the Now. Your future depends on your now and in the now how you choose. And in your choice the knowing. And in your knowing the understanding. And in understanding the knowledge. And in knowledge the guidance. And in guidance the awareness. And in awareness the truth of you the soul. If you are living in the past and future how will you know what you are choosing? And why did you make that choice? How will you know why an experience or an event happened in your life in the now and what choice did you make for this to happen?? What is happening in your present in the now is a result of your choices. To change your now you have to be in the now to know what needs to be changed. You cannot live in the past and future for change to happen now is it? You need to feel your feelings and emotions in the now in order to change the past and build the life you want for your future. Now is where your power lives. It is where your soul lives. And to be in the now commit to meditation, commit to having a spiritual practice everyday. Commit to questioning your beliefs, belief system. Commit to being completely honest with yourself. Only you can help you.

Make a choice to commit to you and then follow the next step to take action on the commitment you just made. And then the next step will show up. Do not think 10-50 steps ahead. Just doing one step and walking one step at a time. That’s how we live in the now. Your next step what you need to do will be shown to you. Your feelings, emotions, negativity, judgement, control, jealousy, guilt, fear, arrogance, hostility, self centered etc are all caused by not staying and practicing to being in the now. Times are such where this is your only savior. Be still. Be Mindful. Learn about you the good, bad and the ugly. If you take care of your now your future will take care of itself.

Mexican street artist Curiot highlights the important lessons of folklore in colourful murals — Life & Soul Magazine

Mexican street artist Favio Martinez, aka Curiot, is bringing symbols and legends of Mexican folklore, mystical and mythical creatures to light to illustrate the important lessons of myths. From Aztec prints to sugar skulls, the artist creates vibrant mythical beasts blending human and animal forms while alluding to a number of Mexican traditions including tribal […]

Mexican street artist Curiot highlights the important lessons of folklore in colourful murals — Life & Soul Magazine

Journey of an Artiste- Under the Tuscun Sun: Choice: Heart or Fear- Nisha Designs

Under the Tuscan Sun: The first time I watched this film in 2003 I was literally at a crossroad in choosing whether I should accept this job offer and move from South Carolina to California or not. Yes no brainer but yes the trickster conscious mind of course had me twirling around like a bee in making my choice. I had to choose between ‘fear and living my dreams’ the fear was all about what I cannot have, do, and be all the physical things right, will it be stable, will i still have a job after a year, will I do good, what if they don’t apply for my green card I will have to go back to India(which was my greatest fear of going back, I didn’t want to go back) and it goes on and on…but it never once showed me the truth of the situation which was I hated my job, I was miserable, I didn’t like living in South Carolina and so now my choice was should i listen to fear and choose to be miserable? Or accept it and live my dreams. Which was the whole point for the trickster conscious mind to set me up for failure, and away from my heart…Phew! Stirred me up crazy coz it didn’t feel right inside me to choose fear.

At that time I had no idea about my inner being, soul. But she was right there of course inside me watching what I was doing and while I was busy in my head arguing with the trickster(which now I know not to give that voice my focus, attn or energy) coz my heart wanted to take a leap of faith but the trickster was stopping me. We kept the choice aside for a moment. And chose to take a break and watch this film. And as soon as this conversation showed up that was it. In a split second I made my choice. No battle, no fear only that I want this and this is it. I had chosen to live my dreams and kick my fear and conscious mind in their ass.

This is how our souls work through us. If we just stay calm we will be able to hear our inner voice. This conversation was like me having a heart to heart talk with my inner being. She had to get me to a movie to get me out of my head and connect to my heart. Our souls work in mysterious ways. Follow the silence. It’s that simple but yet we make it complex for ourselves.

Nick Sider: Artist with an affinity for big cats creates hyperrealistic paintings that stretch “beyond what a photograph could capture” — Life & Soul Magazine

Canadian artist Nick Sider has been fascinated by big cats since he was a child and his meticulous attention to detail in depicting the cat family on canvas is certainly something else. The self-taught artist, now based in New York, has become known for his hyperrealistic paintings that “extend beyond what a photograph could ever […]

Nick Sider: Artist with an affinity for big cats creates hyperrealistic paintings that stretch “beyond what a photograph could capture” — Life & Soul Magazine

Happy Earth Day- Earth Dragon- Nisha Designs

Walking the path of earth is living in harmony with nature in everything we do. The word nature literally means “that which is born.” When the poet e.e. cummings spoke of the difference between “a world of made” and “a world of born” in one of his most famous poems, he gave voice to trust in nature— recognize that the natural world is our home, our source, and the teacher of the wisdom we most need to learn- Philip Carr- Gomm

The Celtic symbol of the dragon is magical, one of transformation and eternal wisdom. The druids respected dragons as forces of nature, the guardians of mother earth and all things sacred, the protectors of nature and all living things. The dragon holds the powerful Celtic symbol of protection and power. These magical beings represented all that the universe has to offer.

Dragon energy was worshiped and used for the greater good. At special celebrations of the turning seasons of the year, to harvest the right crops, as a true guardian for all they held sacred.

The earth dragon has a symbolism of nature and all things connected to our Mother Earth. The earth dragon asks us to connect with nature in all of its beauty. The true wealth is not money but from the beauty of our land.

Call on the energy of the earth dragon if your energy needs grounding, or if you have lost your way a little, she will reconnect you to true source and bring back your power.

Morag Myerscough- her work brightens up space wherever it goes- Nisha Designs

Morag Myerscough is hugely passionate about what she does. Full of energy and full pelt into conversation as soon as I arrive at her London studio – though she admits a couple of coffees were involved – this is mostly her decompressing from presenting to a client that morning. She is passionate about what she does – but what is that? The labels graphic designer, designer and artist have variously been applied, but Myerscough doesn’t care to be labelled. Her website has no bio, and she has no business cards – much to the shock, she says, of a cohort of students she met recently. If you look at her work for clues, one of her best-known projects is a much-photographed wall in London’s new Design Museum, but others include the Temple of Agape on London’s Southbank, a ‘Belonging Bandstand’ that moved around Sussex, bedrooms for the Sheffield children’s hospital, and the 2015 Stirling Prize-winning project of Burntwood School that she collaborated on with architects AHMM.

The Temple of Agape. Image credit: Gareth Gardner

A project she has just presented was Mayfield in Manchester for developer U+I. Mayfield is a formerly derelict site in the process of being regenerated into a mixed-use development and public park. Myerscough’s large installation there displays the common traits in her work: it is a temporary, community-minded intervention in a public space, to be completed in a short deadline. Sceptics might see the combination of developer and artist as an exercise in ‘artwashing’, but there is a history of collaboration between her and Martyn Evans of U+I since a London community project, the Movement Cafe, completed in 2012. Myerscough is confident that what U+I is doing is positive, as ‘they do have a conscience’, and she is careful about who she works with, especially as she becomes better known and people approach her more and more. With developers, she says: ‘There’s always a level of moneymaking … but if you’re not displacing anyone or anything then I think it’s really important that places like Manchester get money put in them by different developers … because, obviously, if the European money gets taken away…’

There is a history of collaboration with U+I since a community project called the Movement Cafe. Image credit: Gareth Gardner

Just as she has to trust the client, they have to trust her. If they do, she ‘will go beyond – far and beyond’. With this trust – and with age too, says Myerscough – comes a sense of freedom and confidence. She no longer feels like a designer fulfilling a brief for a brand, as she explains: ‘Now I’m doing Mayfield, I’m not really responding to it being the brand or whatever; I’m responding to the social environment and all the people.’ It’s a more personal response, ‘a different space where it comes more from me’.

Despite having plenty of experience, Myerscough always looks critically at what she does. She believes it is very important for more established designers to relate to younger generations. With personal growth it can too easily be forgotten that the world is changing too: she talks about the ‘old-school’ and ‘male’ situations still being created by certain, older architecture and design figures, while outside of the industry she laments former prime minister Theresa May being ‘so old-fashioned [as a woman], so wrong in every way’.

One of the best-known projects is a much-photographed wall in London’s new Design Museum. Image credit: Gareth Gardner

Although she frequently collaborates with artist Luke Morgan, Myerscough is a one-woman studio, which she set up in 1993. How she defines herself and her work is important, and she remembers the confidence and ease with which her male peers would start out on their own (Thomas Heatherwick launched his eponymous studio around the same time). Their ease, and her discomfort, was due to rather entrenched attitudes in the industry about gender. She regrets the name slightly – choosing Studio Myerscough rather than Morag Myerscough in order to appear bigger and more established – because she still meets people who are either unable or unwilling to make the connection between her achievements and the studio’s. However, Myerscough prefers remaining on her own even as the projects grow: being the whole of Studio Myerscough gives her freedom with her ideas, time and ambitions, and fewer financial considerations as she hasn’t employees to pay.

Studio Myerscough. Image credit: Luke Morgan

Looking back at Myerscough’s career, you see where the various labels came from. Prior to the studio she studied graphic design, although she has never felt this reflected her work. Professionally, she has been employed as a designer – for Lamb & Shirley post-graduation and then as head of the graphics team for Memphis Group member Michele de Lucci in Milan – before coming back to begin Studio Myerscough. Its first project was a competition for a giant hoarding, which she entered and won with AHMM, and although she never wanted to be an architect the two have worked together on other jobs to much acclaim beside Burntwood School, such as the 2008 Stirling Prize-shortlisted Westminster Academy at the Naim Dangoor Centre, and a new installation in London’s Broadgate development. She was appointed a Royal Designer for Industry, but if she were to describe herself it would be as an artist.

The Belonging Bandstand in Brighton. Image credit: Morag Myerscough

What do you see in Myerscough’s work? For the unfamiliar it is eye-catching: colourful, often large in scale and in the public realm. You can sense her artistic background: her mother was a textile artist, her father a musician, and her family has roots in the circus. She says her penchant for temporary installations is due to the memory of the childhood thrill she felt when the circus came to town – bright colours and gaudy excitement where there was nothing before.

People can be scared of her neons and loud hues, but she uses her experience with colour to challenge those fears. For Sheffield’s children’s hospital the staff initially balked at her multicoloured designs, preferring ‘calming blue and green’. But once ‘they realised we weren’t trying to kill the children’ the mocked-up bedroom designs went down very well with the patients, parents and staff – and, as it turns out, teenagers particularly love orange.

For Sheffield’s children’s hospital the staff initially balked at the multicoloured designs. Image credit: Jill Tate

Sometimes you need to be shown things to understand: Myerscough talks about only realising some of her references for the Temple of Agape project upon walking through the erected structure (such as a temple she visited in India, where light entered beautifully through small openings in the walls).

Myerscough is interested in the difference between looking and seeing – one being passive, the other being active. This affects her approach to working with communities on public projects – considerable impact is made by how volunteers engage with the painting of the piece, able to see it after and say ‘I think I painted that bit’. On that same theme, a festival in Aberdeen called Look Again encouraged locals to reconsider a location in the city called Mercat Cross, which at that time was only frequented by drunks. The project had personal significance for Myerscough because Aberdeen was where her parents met and fell ‘in Love at First Sight’ – the name of the piece she produced for the festival. In among the brilliant team of women running the event, she felt her heritage more keenly than ever, seeing herself as she knew her mum – as a strong Scottish woman.

Myerscough may not like labels, but words are an important part of her work, often appearing large and readable from a distance. These words do not define but hope to provoke conversation. She often likes working with poets, and on Love at First Sight Jo Gilbert contributed with poetry in the local Doric dialect. Myerscough understands that people want to be recognised and appreciated for their unique knowledge and experience, but this can be a challenge for her original vision of a project. In Aberdeen the poem’s 300 words that needed painting were daunting, but Myerscough believes the point of collaboration isn’t to compromise.

Nor is it easy to work with large groups of volunteers rather than a dedicated, trained team, but the rewards are far more valuable, as volunteers treasure the experience. With every project Myerscough learns too – she tells me about how moved she was after a workshop with a blind school, as she never dreamed her work could reach beyond the visual in the way that it did, with the children making ‘incredible’ patterns with stickers and a grid.

At times during the interview I wish she would acknowledge the recognition that different groups want to give her – she inspires architects, designers, artists, nurses, patients, students and more, as their positive feedback testifies. Official accolades are rolling in too: a professorship at UCA Epsom, an honorary fellow at CSM, and a doctorate at Gloucester University, following one she received from Bournemouth, and on top of all this the appointment as a Royal Designer for Industry.

Open and enthusiastic, Myerscough’s heart is on her sleeve, but it is also on the painted surfaces of her work. She could be defined by her many labels and her many awards, but she is most confident in being defined by her work and the responses to it: colourful structures that light up spaces and the faces of those who visit them.

studiomyerscough.com

Words by Sophie Tolhurst

Tadashi Kawamata’s Monumental Wooden Artworks- Nisha Designs

Chaises ©Leo van der Kleij

Tadashi Kawamata is a man with a material, wood. With this he builds cabins, observatories, nests and monumental frescos that are at home both in galleries and in the heart of towns and cities. While you might think that the artist, educated at the Tokyo University of the Arts, would use only high quality woods, the reality is rather different. Kawamata instead uses recycled wood from furniture from junk shops, old crates and other left over materials. These recycled materials have been elevated by art, both make for beautiful creative objects, and have a low environmental impact. 

The artist works between Paris and Tokyo and began attracting global attention in the 1970s with his in situ works entitled By Land. He installed wood cabins in the most inaccessible parts of New York and Tokyo, such as Madison Square. A few years later he created Les chaises de traverse, a huge pile of wooden chairs suspended between the floor and the ceiling in the Delme synagogue. A few miles the artist also filled the Saint-Livier Hotel in Metz with a wall of chairs. In a short film by Gilles Coudert, the artist explains how each of the chairs represents a different person with a different history, and the wall is as if each of these people were linked together. In 2010 the artist scaled up, setting up a cabin in front of the Centre Pompidou before his chef d’oeuvre at the Renaissance Palazzo Strozzi in Florence. 

Engaged artworks

Tadashi Kawamata, Wave, 2016 Installation in situ. Éléments de mobilier en bois récupérés. Vue d’exposition “Tadashi Kawamata. Under the Water – Metz”, Centre Pompidou-Metz, 2016 © Tadashi Kawamata © Centre Pompidou-Metz / Photo Noémie Gotti

Tadashi Kawamata, Wave, 2016 Installation in situ. Éléments de mobilier en bois récupérés. Vue d’exposition “Tadashi Kawamata. Under the Water – Metz”, Centre Pompidou-Metz, 2016 © Tadashi Kawamata © Centre Pompidou-Metz / Photo Noémie Gotti

In 2011 the work of Kawamata took on a new dimension following the tsunami that hit Japan. In Tokyo during the earthquake, he soon left for Paris, while people at home were on the front line helping one another, the artist wondered how he could maintain a link with them. He soon made one of his most emblematic works Under the Water a huge wooden wave recreating the tsunami that ravaged the Japanese coastlines. The work was exhibited at the Centre Pompidou Metz and at the gallery Kamel Mennour where the artist often shows.

Some would like to categorise it as an activist project, but Kawamata firmly rejects the appellation, I’m not an activist, he says, preferring instead to think about the political and social aspects of an issue in a different way. His work would be better described as Land Art, a name given to him when he was appointed the Ordre des Arts et des Lettres in 2014. The contemporary art movement however also uses natural materials but is more oriented towards work that uses nature as its canvas, whereas Kawamata is more at home in the urban or public spaces. 

Ephemeral artworks

Tadashi Kawamata Under the Water Metz 2016 Installation in situ. Eléments de mobilier en bois récupérés. Vue d’exposition Tadashi Kawamata. Under the Water Metz, Centre Pompidou-Metz 2016 © Tadashi Kawamata © Centre Pompidou-Metz Photo Noémie Gotti

Tadashi Kawamata Under the Water Metz 2016 Installation in situ. Eléments de mobilier en bois récupérés. Vue d’exposition Tadashi Kawamata. Under the Water Metz, Centre Pompidou-Metz 2016 © Tadashi Kawamata © Centre Pompidou-Metz Photo Noémie Gotti

The work of Tadashi Kawamata is marked by its ephemeral nature. His monumental wooden creations both infiltrate and accompany buildings, but are easily dismounted and given a new artistic life.

Nothing is recurring, nothing is permanent states the artist. No material can survive for eternity, everything is temporary. It is just a question of time, even a building that lasts 1000 years is temporary. Nothing is resistant to the wear of time, not men, not walls. 

Destruction n°32 ©Archives kamel mennour
Destruction n°20 ©Archives kamel mennour
©Photo archives kamel mennour

Via: https://pen-online.com/arts/tadashi-kawamatas-monumental-wooden-artworks/?scrolled=1

Savage Beauty: Light artist Kari Kola transforms Ireland’s Connemara mountains with stunning colour and light display- Nisha Designs- Life & Soul Magazine

Savage Beauty, an online art experience created by Finnish light artist Kari Kola, has transformed Ireland’s Connemara mountains in a spectacular display of colour and light.

Kari Kola’s installation of 1,000 lights transforms a 5 kilometre-stretch of the mountain range in County Galway in a wash of vibrant pulsating colours, in what has been heralded by exhibition organisers, Galway 2020 European Capital of Culture, as “the largest site-specific light artwork ever created”.

The display was initially planned as a live exhibition for people to experience the light and colour show in the Connemara setting itself to coincide with St Patrick’s Day celebrations between 14-17 Match, however the live events were cancelled following government guidance on public gatherings due to Covid-19 virus.

Galway 2020 European Capital of Culture has now made the Savage Beauty artwork available as a special digital edition via their website.

Connemara National Park situated in the scenic west coast of Ireland spans for nearly 3,000 hectares. The park offers some majestic views which includes picturesque mountains, expanses of bog lands, heaths, grasslands and woodlands. Some of these mountains form part of the famous Twelve Bens group of small mountains that are the dominant feature of the Connemara countryside.

The light show, entitled Savage Beauty, takes its name from the Irish playwright and poet, Oscar Wilde, who described Connemara as a “savage beauty”.

Artist Kari Kola, who has directed over 2,000 projects in dramatic settings including Stonehenge in 2018, said: “Since I can’t paint, I paint with light. I’m also interested in light beyond its artistic value. Everything on the planet is based on light. I’m working with scientific projects and new, futuristic techniques. With abstract light, there are as many stories as there are viewers. If I can choose, I always work with nature because that’s the best art that we have.

“I am very disappointed that the public exhibition of this work had to be cancelled, but I hope that this digital edition will show how we played with scale in Connemara and created something that people would not expect.”

Image Credit: Christopher Lund

Savage Beauty

Rosa Medea is Life & Soul Magazine’s Chief. She writes about lifestyle including sustainable and green living. She also offers content services to businesses and individuals at Rosamedea.com